English Department

COURSES 2001-2002

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  • B.A. Program First year, Fall 2001
  • 05.15.01-956 General Linguistics
  • 05.15.02-016 Phonetics I
  • 05.15.03-006 Composition I
  • 05.15.04-006 British History and Culture
  • 05.15.06-016 British Literature I
  • B.A. Program First year, Spring 2002
  • 05.15.11-920 History of the English Language
  • 05.15.12-946 English Grammar
  • 05.15.13-020 Composition II
  • 05.15.14-010 American History and Culture
  • 05.15.16-020 American Literature I
  • B.A. Program 05.15 2ND & 3RD YEAR - COMPULSORY COURSES
  • 05.15.18-016 Literary Theory
  • 05.15.22-976 British Literature II
  • 05.15.50-856 B.A.Thesis (5.0 cr.)
  • 05.15.51-856 B.A. Thesis (10 cr.)
  • B.A. Program 05.15 2ND & 3RD YEAR -ELECTIVE COURSES
  • 05.15.39-016 Linguistics II
  • 05.15.45-016 Applied Linguistics: Media Language
  • 05.15.49-016 Beowulf
  • 05.15.64-016 Novel and Film: Austen, Eliot and James
  • 05.15.87-016 Dialects II
  • 05.16.50-016 Canadian Fiction
  • 05.16.60-016 Tragedy
  • 05.17.07-016 ESP: English for Tourism
  • 05.15.21-946 Prosody
  • 05.15.56-020 Background to English Literature
  • 05.15.68-020 Restoration Drama
  • 05.15.69-020 British Contemporary Literature
  • 05.15.72-020 The British Novel in the 18th Century
  • 05.16.44-020 20th-Century Scottish Literature
  • 05.16.49-020 Chaucer's Canterbury Tales
  • 05.17.05-020 ESP: Business English
  • 05.17.06-020 ESP: Legal English
  • English for Practical Purposes 05.17 - COMPULSORY COURSES
  • 05.17.01-006 English Proficiency I
  • 05.17.02-016 Spoken English I
  • 05.15.03-006 Composition I
  • 05.15.04-006 British History and Culture
  • 05.17.04-010 English Proficiency II
  • 05.17.08-020 Spoken English II
  • 05.15.14-010 American History and Culture
  • English for Practical Purposes 05.17 - ELECTIVE COURSES
  • 05.17.07-016 ESP: English for Tourism
  • 05.15.06-016 British Literature I
  • 05.15.45-016 Applied Linguistics: Media Language
  • 05.15.87-016 English Dialects II
  • 05.17.05-020 ESP: Business English
  • 05.17.06-020 ESP: Legal English
  • 05.15.11-920 History of the English Language
  • 05.15.12-946 English Grammar
  • 05.15.13-020 Composition II
  • 05.15.16-020 American Literature I
  • 05.15.56-020 Background to English Literature
  • 05.40.65-020 Applied Icelandic for Translators
  • 05.50.23-946 Translation
  • M.A. Program 05.16
  • 05.16.50-016 Canadian Fiction
  • 05.16.60-016 Tragedy
  • 05.90.01-016 Research and Pedagogy in Foreign Language Learning
  • 05.16.44-020 20th-Century Scottish Literature
  • 05.16.49-020 Chaucer's Canterbury Tales
  • 05.16.92-996 Research Project A
  • 05.16.93-000 Research Project B
  • 05.16.94-000 Research Project C
  • 05.16.95-916 M.A. Essay (15 cr.)
  • 05.16.96-916 M.A. Essay (20 cr.)
  • M.Paed. Program 05.90/05.18
  • 05.90.01-006 Research and Pedagogy
  • 05.90.02-006 First and Second Language Acquisition
  • 05.18.01-006 English as a Second/Foreign Language
  • 05.90.03-020 Discourse Analysis and Literacy Skills in a Foreign Language
  • S 05.18.02-020 Discourse Analysis and Literacy Skills in English
  • 05.90.04-020 Teaching Spoken Language
  • 05.18.03-020 Teaching Spoken English
  • 05.18.25-010 M.Paed. Research Project (10 cr.)

  • COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 2001-2002

    B.A. Program First Year, Fall 2001

    05.15.01-956 General Linguistics (2.5 cr.) F 2L

    Instructor: Matthew Whelpton
    This course offers a general introduction to modern linguistic theory. The study of language is presented within the general context of problems in the study of the human mind and human nature. Students are introduced to the core areas of linguistic theory, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics.
    Text: W. O'Grady, M. Dobrovolsky and F. Katamba, (eds): Contemporary Linguistics: An Introduction, 3rd edition, Longman. Assessment: a final examination (2 hours).

    05.15.02-016 Phonetics I(2.5 cr.) F  2L

    Instructor: Pétur Knútsson
    This course deals with the problems of spoken English for foreign students, particularly Icelandic. Although educated British English will be our basic model, we will deal with the main differences between British and American English, and other varieties if the need arises. The main aim of the course is to make students aware of the way in which they are pronouncing English, and what effects this may have for their communicative abilities.
    Main Texts: Roach, Peter. English Phonetics and Phonology. C.U.P. Pétur Knútsson. English Pronunciation for Icelanders. Workbook and 3 CD's. Málver heimspekideildar. Wells, J.C. Longman Pronunciation Dictionary. Longman Assessment: Class and home assignments 30%; final examination (2 hours) 70%

    05.15.03-006 Composition I (2.5 cr.) F 2S

    Instructor: Eva Heisler
    Aims: The ability to write well in English is a prerequisite for all other courses in the English department. The main aim of this course is to equip students to write in English for academic purposes. Course work will involve reading and writing essays of different types. There will be a strong emphasis on the organization of ideas as well as on style.
    Main textbook to be announced. Assessment: Four term essays (80% of final grade) and one end of course essay written under examination conditions (20% of final grade). A pass is required in both components.

    05.15.04-006 British History and Culture (2.5 cr.) F 2L

    Instructor: Julian D'Arcy
    The aim of this course is to give students a good overview of the social, political and cultural background to Great Britain.
    Texts: John Oakland: British Civilization (4th ed.) and The Oxford Guide to British and American Culture by Growther & Kavanagh. Assessment: a final examination (2 hours).

    05.15.06-016 British Literature I (5 cr.) F 4L

    Instructor: Julian D'Arcy
    This is a survey course in British Literature from the beginnings of Romanticism to the early twentieth century.
    Textbooks: Norton Anthology of English Literature (The Major Authors), Emily Brontë's Wuthering Heights. Assessment: a final examination (3 hours).

    B.A. Program First Year, Spring 2002

    05.15.11-920 History of the English Language (2.5 cr.) S 2L

    Instructor: Pétur Knútsson
    An overview of the history and development of the English language.
    Text: to be announced. Assessment: 2-3 assignments and final examination (2 hours).

    05.15.12-946 English Grammar (2.5 cr.) S 2L

    Instructor: Birna Arnbjörnsdóttir
    This course introduces students to important aspects of English grammar. The course shows how descriptive observations concerning derivational morphology, inflectional morphology, syntactic categories, lexical phrase structure, and sentence structure in English can be accounted for within a general theoretical framework.
    Text: to be announced. Assessment: assignments & a final examination (2 hours).

    05.15.13-020 Composition II (2.5 cr.) S 2S

    Instructor: Eva Heisler
    Prerequisite: 05.15.03 Composition I.
    The course continues with work from Composition I, but the emphasis shifts from general essay writing to writing about short literary texts. One of the three weekly sessions will be devoted to spoken English practice.
    Main textbook: to be decided. Assessment: four term essays (50% of final grade), one end-of-course essay (50% of final grade). A pass is required in both components.

    05.15.14-010 American History and Culture (2.5 cr.) S 2L

    Instructor: Magnús Fjalldal
    The aim of this course is to give students a good overview of the social and political background of the United States. In the process of doing this we will examine pattern of American culture, political and social institutions and ethnic and minority groups.
    Texts: American Civilization by David Mauk and John Oakland, 2nd. ed. and American Cultural Studies - An Introduction to American Culture, by Campbell and Kean. Assessment: an examination (2 hours).

    05.15.16-020 American Literature I (5 cr.) S 4L

    Instructor: Martin Regal
    A historical survey of 19th & early 20th century American Literature, including Edgar Allen Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Emily Dickinson & Walt Whitman.
    Text: The Norton Anthology of American Literature. Shorter ed. Assessment: final examination (3 hours).

    SECOND AND THIRD YEARS: COMPULSORY COURSES


    All first-year courses must be completed before entering the second year and students are expected have a minimum grade of 7.0 in Composition I and II. Please note that second- and third-year students are expected to be proficient in spoken and written English. Basic language training is not available at this stage, and basic language mistakes are not acceptable.

    05.15.18-016  Literary Theory (5 cr.) F 4L

    Instructor: Martin Regal
    An overview of literary theory, with particular emphasis on late twentieth century readings and interpretation.
    Text: Literary Theories: A Reader and Guide, ed. Julian Wolfreys, Edinburgh Univ. Press, 1999. Assessment: final examination (3 hours).

    05.15.22-976  British Literature II (5 cr.) S 4L

    Instructor: Robert Cook
    A survey reading of major works of English Literature from the beginnings to 1800, including Beowulf and works by Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Johnson, Donne, Milton, Swift and Pope.
    Text: The Norton Anthology of English Literature. The Major Authors. Assessment: in-class examination 20%, mid-term examination 30%, final examination 50% (3 hours).

    05.15.50-856  B.A.Thesis (5 cr.) F/S

    The Faculty of Arts requires a final version of the B.A. essay to be handed in to a student's supervisor no later than 1st October, 3rd January, or 1st May (depending on date of graduation). Students should remember that several drafts are usually submitted to the supervisor before the final version is agreed upon.

    05.15.51-856  B.A. Thesis (10 cr.) F/S

    The 10 credit option on the B.A. thesis is reserved exclusively for projects where the work involved is considered to be at least double the amount of an ordinary B.A. essay. This does not mean that any long essay (40 pp. or more) is automatically given 10 credits. No student may begin writing a B.A. thesis for 10 credits without special permission from the Departmental Committee.

    SECOND AND THIRD YEARS: ELECTIVE COURSES

    05.15.45-016  Applied Linguistics: Media English (2.5 cr.) F 2L

    Instructor: Matthew Whelpton
    This course is intended to help students develop a critical reading of media texts (principally from British newspapers and advertising). The focus will be on a sensitivity to the linguistic features of texts which are crucial in building up discourse interpretation. As it is a practical course, the emphasis will be on the discussion of particular texts rather than the presentation of general theories of interpretation.
    Texts: G. Cook: The Discourse of Advertising, Routledge, and R. Fowler: Language in the News, Routledge. Assessment: two set essays, each of 1,500 words, each carrying 50% of the final grade.

    05.15.49-016  Beowulf (2.5 cr.) F 2L

    Instructor: Robert Cook
    We will read this Anglo-Saxon classic in the new translation by the Nobel Prize-Winner Seamus Heaney, with glances at other translations and at the original text. A knowledge of Old English is not required. We will consider the legendary, historical and Christian elements of the poem, as well as its literary qualities.
    Assessment: assignments 50% & final examination (2 hours) 50%.

    05.15.64-016 Novel and Film: Jane Austen, George Eliot and Henry James (2.5 cr.) F 2L

    Instructor: Robert Cook
    We will read three major nineteenth and early twentieth-century novels ? Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, George Eliot's Middlemarch and Henry James' The Golden Bowl ? analyzing them in their own right and comparing them to their filmed versions.
    Assessment: 2 short essays (25%, 35%), three-hour final examination (40%).

    05.15.87-016  English Dialects II: Overseas (2.5 cr.) F   2L

    Instructor: Pétur Knútsson
    A survey of English language variation outside the British Isles, including an introduction to the linguistics of pidgins and creoles. Students should be aware of the basic principles of modern dialectology and the sociology of language variation and change, which was covered in 05.15.33 English dialects I.
    Texts to be announced. Assessment: written assignments and recognition tests in Language Laboratory.

    05.16.50-016  Canadian Fiction (5 cr.) F 4L

    Instructor: Guðrún Björk Guðsteinsdóttir
    See course description (M.A. Program).
    Assessment: 2 essays, each 50%.

    05.16.60-016  Tragedy (5 cr.) F 4L

    Instructor: Martin Regal
    See course description below (M.A. Program).
    Assessment: essay 50%, final examination 50% (3 hours).

    05.17.07-016 English for Special Purposes: English for Tourism (2.5 cr.) F 4D+1G


    Supervisor: Birna Arnbjörnsdóttir
    See course description below (English for Practical Purposes).

    05.15.21-946 English Prosody (2.5 cr.) S  2L

    Instructor: Pétur Knútsson
    In the first part of this course we will look at the patterns of stress and intonation of spoken R.P. We will then go on to review of the basic principles of poetic metre in English at various times and the relationship between poetic metre and the prosodic patterns of spoken English. There will be exercises in formal recitation of prose and poetry.
    Texts: to be announced. Assessment: practical sessions, 2 written assignments.

    05.15.39-016  Linguistics II  (2.5 cr.) S 2L

    Instructor: Matthew Whelpton
    This course offers a detailed introduction to the study of English sentence structure from the perspective of modern linguistic theory. The course has two main aims: to introduce students to the Principles and Parameters framework of generative linguistics as it applies to English; and to offer students practical help in the structural analysis of sentences.
    Text: L. Haegeman and J. Gueron: English Grammar: A Generative Perspective, Blackwell. Assessment: a three hour examination on theory in December and a two hour in-class test on tree diagram analysis.

    05.15.56-020  Background to English Literature: The Bible and Classical Mythology (2.5 cr.) S 2L

    Instructor: Magnús Fjalldal
    The purpose of this course is twofold: 1) to become familiar with the some of the more important stories and ideas of the Bible and to study the major classical myths of ancient Greece, 2) to examine the various ways in which these have been used (and abused) in English and American literature.
    Texts: The Authorized Version (King James Version) of the Bible (any edition). Edith Hamilton: Mythology. Assessment: final examination (2 hours).

    05.15.68-020  Restoration Drama (2.5 cr.) S 2L

    Instructor: Martin Regal
    An in-depth study of the British drama in the late 17th century, after the re-opening of the theatres. The focus will be divided between the influence of Shakespeare and the desire to escape that influence among playwrights such as Dryden, Wycherley, Etherege, Behn, Congreve, Vanburgh and Farquhar.
    Text: Restoration Drama: An Anthology, ed. David Womersley (Blackwell, 2000). Assessment: two term papers, 50% each.

    05.15.69-020  British Contemporary Literature (2.5 cr.) S 2L


    Fríða Björk Ingvarsdóttir
    The contemporary novel will be discussed, and students will read works by the generation of established writers that precipitated innovation in the early eighties, as well as authors of interest that have appeared in their wake. Among the former are Graham Swift, Ian McEwan, Margaret Atwood and Jeanette Winterson; and of the generation that subsequently made their mark, Hanif Kureishi, Will Self, Mick Jackson and Helen de Witt. These works will be read in relation to cultural and historical paradigms, to illustrate how the discourse on narrative techniques, the role of the language and the relativity of fiction is revealed in their works. Auxilliary texts include articles by many of the foremost ideologists of the last decades, such as Italo Calvino, Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, Andreas Huyssen and Christina Brooke-Rose amongst others.
    Assessment: essay.

    05.15.72-020  The British Novel in the 18th Century (2.5 cr.) S  2L

    Instructor: Julian D'Arcy
    A study of the novel in Britain in the 18th century with special reference to theories on the origins and development of the genre and its representations of gender and class. Works studied will include novels by Daniel Defoe, Samuel Richardson, Henry Fielding, and Jane Austen.
    Assessment: essay 30%, final examination (2 hours) 70%.

    05.16.44-020  20th-Century Scottish Literature(5e) S   4L

    Instructor: Julian D'Arcy
    See course description below (M.A. Program).
    Assessment: essay 30%, final examination 50% (3 hours).

    05.16.49-020  Chaucer's Canterbury Tales (5 cr.) S    4L

    Instructor: Magnús Fjalldal
    See course description below (M.A. Program).
    Assessment: final examination (3 hours), or essay and final examination (2 hours).

    05.17.05-020  English for Special Purposes: Business English (2.5 cr.) S 4D+1G

    Supervisor: Birna Arnbjörnsdóttir
    See course description below (English for Practical Purposes).

    05.17.06-020  English for Special Purposes: Legal English (2.5 cr.) S 2L

    Instructor: NN
    See course description below (English for Practical Purposes).

    English for Practical Purposes 05.17

    COMPULSORY COURSES - Fall 2001


    05.17.01-006  English Proficiency I (2.5 cr.) F 4D


    Supervisor: Birna Arnbjörnsdóttir
    Directed self-study course providing students with training in basic and advanced language skills in the Multi-Media Centre. Requires computer competence.

    05.17.02-016  Spoken English I (2.5 cr.) F  2G


    Supervisor: Birna Arnbjörnsdóttir
    Training in spoken English in groups and in pronunciation in the Language Laboratory. To be taken with English Proficiency I.
    Text: to be announced. Assessment: continuous.

    05.15.03-006  Composition I (2.5 cr.) F 2G

    Instructor: Eva Heisler
    See course description above (B.A. Program).

    05.15.04-006  British History and Culture (2.5 cr.) F 2L

    Instructor: Julian D'Arcy
    See course description above (B.A. Program).

    COMPULSORY COURSES - Spring 2002


    05.17.04-010  English Proficiency II (2.5 cr.) S 4D


    Supervisor: Birna Arnbjörnsdóttir
    Continues from 05.17.01 English Proficiency I.

    05.17.08-020  Spoken English II (2.5 cr.) S  2G


    Supervisor: Birna Arnbjörnsdóttir
    Continues from 05.17.02 Spoken English I. To be taken with English Proficiency II.

    05.15.14-010  American History and Culture (2.5 cr.) S 2L

    Instructor: Magnús Fjalldal
    See course description above (B.A. Program).

    ELECTIVE COURSES - Spring 2002

    05.17.07-016  English for Special Purposes: English for Tourism (2.5 cr.) F 4D+1G


    Supervisor: Birna Arnbjörnsdóttir
    This is an applied course, focusing on developing students's confidence and fluency in the English language. The goal is to use correct grammar, gain fluency in speaking and writing, build an effective vocabulary for the travel industry, and use and recognize appropriate communication formats.
    Assessment: continuous

    05.15.06-016 British Literature I (5 cr.) F 4L

    Instructor: Julian D'Arcy
    See course description above (B.A. Program).

    05.15.45-016  Applied Linguistics: Media English (2.5 cr.) F 2L

    Instructor: Matthew Whelpton
    See course description above (B.A. Program).

    05.15.87-016 English Dialects II: Overseas (2.5 cr.) F   2L

    Instructor: Pétur Knútsson
    See course description above (B.A. Program).

    05.17.05-020  English for Special Purposes: Business English (2.5 cr.) S    4D+1G


    Supervisor: Birna Arnbjörnsdóttir
    This is an applied course, focusing on developing students's confidence and fluency in the English language. The goal is to use correct grammar, gain fluency in speaking and writing, build an effective business vocabulary, and use and recognize appropriate business communication formats.

    05.17.06-020  English for Special Purposes: Legal English (2.5 cr.) S 2L

    Instructor: NN
    English Legal language and culture. This course engages with a broad range of legal texts and contexts in order to equip students with a knowledge of the English legal system and a grounding in the reading, writing, oral, and research skills which are needed in order to access, present and understand legal matters in English.
    Texbook: Riley, Alison. English for Law. London: Macmillan, 1991. Assessment: assignments and final examination (2 hours).

    05.15.11-920 History of the English Language (2.5 cr.) S 2L

    Instructor: Pétur Knútsson
    See course description above (B.A. Program).

    05.15.12-946 English Grammar (2.5 cr.) S 2L

    Instructor: Birna Arnbjörnsdóttir
    See course description above (B.A. Program).

    05.15.13-020  Composition II (2.5 cr.) S 2G

    Instructor: Eva Heisler
    See course description above (B.A. Program).

    05.15.16-020  American Literature I (5 cr.) S 4L

    Instructor: Martin Regal
    See course description above (B.A. Program).

    05.15.56-020 Background to English Literature: The Bible and Classical Mythology (2.5 cr.) S 2L

    Instructor: Magnús Fjalldal
    See course description above (B.A. Program).

    ELECTIVES FROM OTHER PROGRAMS

    05.40.65-020  Applied Icelandic for Translators (2.5 cr.) S Icel.  2L Instructor: Jón G. Friðjónsson


    The course provides practical training in applying Icelandic usage in translations of English (and other) texts into Icelandic. Special emphasis will be placed on those characteristics which differentiate Icelandic from other languages, e.g. in the the use of aspects and prepositions. The course considers translation problems from theoretical as well as applied perspectives.

    05.50.23-946  Translation (2.5 cr.) S Icel.  2L

    Instructor: Jón G. Friðjónsson
    Intended for students who have Icelandic as second or other language. Prerequisites: Courses 05.50.07-05.50.16 in Icelandic for foreign students. Survey of the main concepts in translation theory and of problems occurring in translations into and from Icelandic. Teaching takes the form of lectures and seminars. Students carry out assignments and present them orally in class. Students also work on translations of practical and literary texts.

    M.A. Program  05.16

    The M.A. program is open to students who have completed a B.A. degree in English at the University of Iceland (60 or 90 credits) or who have a comparable degree from a foreign university, with a grade point average of 7.25 at B.A. level (or its equivalent) and a minimum of 8 for their B.A. Essay. Foreign students who are not native speakers will be required to complete Composition I or II in the first semester of their studies.
     The M.A. degree consists of 60 credits of study, of which at least 30 credits must consist of courses taught by the department at M.A.-level or comparable English courses evaluated from other universities. The Department may evaluate M.A. courses from other departments in the Faculty of Arts that have been undertaken in consultation with the student's adviser.
     The department offers two 5-credit courses each term at M.A. level, each course meeting for 3 hours each week. Students will be expected to cover much of the course material independently. In addition students may also take 5 cr. projects of individual research and complete 15 credits of study per term (see below).
     M.A. students writing a 15-credit thesis may take up to 15 credits from the English BA program, and M.A. students writing a 20-credit thesis may take up to 10 credits from the English B.A. program, with the following conditions:
     Undergraduate courses may be taken with the agreement of the teacher(s) concerned, and on the condition that extra work is required in the form of a 10-page theoretical essay or the equivalent for 5-credit courses, or a 5-page essay or the equivalent for 2.5-credit courses.
     Undergraduate courses in English already completed by the student before entering the M.A. program, but not counted towards the student's B.A., may be re-evaluated as part of the M.A. course (5 B.A.-credits giving 3 M.A. credits, and 2.5 B.A. credits giving l.5 M.A. credits). Credits evaluated at B.A. level from other departments may not be re-evaluated into the M.A. program. Credits re-evaluated in this way count as part of the total number of credits allowed from the undergraduate program.

    M.A. Program - Fall 2001

    05.16.50-016  Canadian Fiction (5 cr.) F 4L

    Instructor: Guðrún Björk Guðsteinsdóttir
    The themes of postcolonialism and multiculturalism in Canadian literature will be studied. Authors to be considered will include Margaret Laurence, Margaret Atwood, Kristjana Gunnars, David Arnason, and Michael Ondaatje.
    Assessment: 2 essays, 30% & 70%.

    05.16.60-016  Tragedy (5 cr.) F 4L

    Instructor: Martin Regal
    An overview of the theory and practice of tragedy from the Greeks to the present day. Course reading will include nine plays (3 classical, 3 Renaissance and 3 modern) as well as critical materials.
    Assessment: term paper 70% & final examination 30% (3 hours).

    05.90.01-016 Research and Pedagogy in Foreign Language Learning (5 cr.) F Icel.  4L

    Instructors: Auður Hauksdóttir & Birna Arnbjörnsdóttir
    See course description below (M.Paed. Program).

    M.A. Program - Spring 2002

    05.16.44-020  20th-Century Scottish Literature(5e) S   4L

    Instructor: Julian D'Arcy
    A study of the so-called Scottish Renaissance (1920-50), its major pioneers, poets and writers, and its influence on a new generation of Scottish writers over the last thirty years. The main authors to be considered will include: Hugh MacDiarmid, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Neil Gunn, Emma Tennant, Jessie Kesson, Alasdair Gray and Irvine Welsh.
    Assessment: 2 essays, 30% & 70%.

    05.16.49-020  Chaucer's Canterbury Tales (5 cr.) S       4L

    Instructor: Magnús Fjalldal
    The course will examine the various lewd and serious stories that make up this work and the very different interpretations that they have been given, individually and as a whole. The tales are read in Middle English.
    Text: L. Benson et al: The Riverside Chaucer(3rd Edition), Oxford University Press. Assessment: term paper 30% & final examination 70% (3 hours).

    05.16.92-996 Research Project A (5 cr.) F/S

    05.16.93-000 Research Project B (5 cr.) F/S

    05.16.94-000 Research Project C (5 cr.) F/S


    M.A. students are permitted to complete a total of 15 credits in supervised research projects. A project is selected in consultation with a teacher at the M.A. level, and that teacher must approve the sudent's research plans before he or she is permitted to register for a study of this kind. Research projects should either be an extension of a course or courses that students have already completed in the M.A. program or be within their special field of interest.

    05.16.95-916 M.A. Essay (15 cr.) F/S

    05.16.96-916 M.A. Essay (20 cr.) F/S


    Research essay on linguistics or literature. Students are to consult a suitable supervisor in choosing their area of research and attend regular meetings while developing the project.
     Required length: 60-100 pgs. (15 cr.) or 100-150 pgs. (20 cr.), spacing 1_, paper size A4. Upon completion of the essay, the student hands in 3 bound copies to the supervisor.

    M.Paed. Program  05.90, 05.18

    The M.Paed. program is open to students who have completed a B.A. degree in English at the University of Iceland (60 or 90 credits) or who have a comparable degree from a foreign university, with a grade point average of 7.25 at B.A. level (or its equivalent) and a minimum of 8 for their B.A. Essay. Foreign students who are not native speakers will be required to complete Composition I or II in the first semester of their studies.
     The program is oriented towards teaching and research in the field of English as a second language at Compulsory and Upper-Secondary school levels. All courses are obligatory. Four courses are conducted in Icelandic: 05.90.01 Research and Pedagogy in Foreign Language Learning, 05.90.02 First and Second Language Acquisition, 05.90.03 Discourse Analysis and Literacy Skills in a Foreign Language, and 05.90.04 Teaching Spoken Language. These courses are open to students in Danish, English, and Icelandic. Other course work is conducted in English.

    M.Paed. Fall 2001

    05.90.01-016  Research and Pedagogy in Foreign Language Learning (5 cr.) F Icel.  4L

    Instructors: Auður Hauksdóttir & Birna Arnbjörnsdóttir
    This course will provide an overview of the historical development of teaching methodology and explore the connection between pedagogy and theories of language acquisition. Approaches such as Communicative Competence, English for Specific Purposes, Language and Content, Language for Academic Purposes, and Survival English will be explored with special emphasis on teaching adults and adolescents.
    Assessment: assignment and final examination.

    05.90.02-006  First and Second Language Acquisition (2.5 cr.)

    F Icel.  2L Instructors: Hrafnhildur Ragnarsdóttir, Sigríður Sigurjónsdóttir, & Birna Arnbjörnsdóttir
    This course will concentrate on the acquisition of first, second, and subsequent languages.
    Assessment: assignment.

    05.18.01-006  English as a Second/Foreign Language (2.5 cr.) F  2L

    Instructor: Birna Arnbjörnsdóttir
    This course will focus on the examination of the process of learning English as a foreign language, with reference to the major theories covered in the previous course. Students will have an opportunity to conduct their own research on the linguistic, social, psychological and academic factors which influence variation in the language learning process and the levels of proficiency attained.
    Assessment: research assignment.

    M.Paed. Spring 2002

    05.90.03-020 Discourse Analysis and Literacy Skills in a Foreign Language (2.5 cr.) S  Icel.  2L

    Instructor: Birna Arnbjörnsdóttir
    In this course, studies of the nature of reading, writing and vocabulary development in foreign language learning will be examined.
    Assessment: 2 assignments.

    05.18.02-020 Discourse Analysis and Literacy Skills in English (2.5cr.) S  2L

    Instructor: Birna Arnbjörnsdóttir & NN
    This course will focus on teaching vocabulary, reading and writing proficiency in English and ways to integrate those skills into an effective, communicative curriculum. Students will gain an understanding of cross cultural discourse, and explore the process writing approach in teaching writing. Finally, students will look at strategies to facilitate reading and text comprehension.
    Assessment: research assignment.

    05.90.04-020 Teaching Spoken Language (2.5 cr.) S  Icel.  2L
    NN


    This course will examine current perspectives on the teaching and learning of pronunciation, speaking, listening and grammar. The nature of cultural competence will be examined through the use of appropriate registers and an understanding of the pragmatic nature of language use.
    Assessment: 2 assignments.

    05.18.03-020 Teaching Spoken English (2.5 cr.) S  2L

    Instructor: Birna Arnbjörnsdóttir
    Approaches to teaching and learning English pronunciation, speaking and listening will be explored. Students will examine the role of grammar in language teaching, and look at ways to integrate these skills into a communicative curriculum.
    Assessment: research assignment.

    05.18.25-010 M.Paed. Research Project (10 cr.) S


    The goal of this research project is to enable educators to identify and meet the challenges of today's language classrooms and become active participants in creating the knowledge base we have in the area of foreign language pedagogy. This action research project has two components: First students will identify a classroom based issue that pertains to either the teaching or learning of a foreign or second language. Students will then form hypotheses and collect, analyze and interpret the data. Secondly, students will propose appropriate actions based on the results of their study. This could be in the form of teaching strategies, curricula, assessment, program development or any other classroom based activity.